Origin Dukelow family, including Coughlan, Baker, Kingston and Williamson ancestors

On the Bandon genealogy site there is a reference to Rev. Paul Duelos Vicar Ballymodan marrying Frances Marriott (sounds Huguenot) 1882 he died 1717, 5 daughters. It may be a version of Dukelow.

For Durrus connections:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdFRIZDNndWpFbzV4d3pUeFl0LV8xYmc&usp=drive_web#gid=0

Dukelow Family History part 1

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  • Paul
    Here’s some good research done by Kerry Campion (Dukelow) which might be relevant to some people on here.THE DUKELOWS

    French Origins

    It appears that the name

    Dukelow was originally Duclos, a French Huguenot surname of locative origin, deriving from the place where the initial bearer once lived or held land. In this instance we have a derivation of the old French terms ‘du’, meaning ‘from’ and ‘clos’ meaning enclosure or farm. Alternatively, there may also have been an occupative origin from the ancient French term ‘closser’ (farmer, large producer of grain or corn), referring to their occupation. Among the numerous variations were Duclaux, Duclous, Duclot, Clos, and Closel etc. During the course of research, the following misspellings have been found: Ducklow, Duklow, Dubelow, Dupelow etc.

    Among the earliest references in France to the name can be found a Daniel de Cachalon, who was ennobled by letters patent in Pau on 27th April 1609, when he also obtained a house located in Pontacq, called “Duclos”. There was a parish priest, Claude Duclos in the 1640′s and the family Duclos de Bouillas was ennobled in Toulouse in 1748.

    Being Protestants, the French Huguenots were subject to much persecution from the mid-1500′s onwards. One of the most notorious acts of persecution was the massacre of some 100,000 Protestants on the Feast of St Bartholomew’s Day in 1572. An era of tyranny took over after this and continued until 1598 when the Edict of Nantes gave a measure of freedom and protection from persecution. Despite the Edict, the suffering of the Huguenots provoked major emigration. England and Scotland were popular destinations, but the vast majority fled to the United States. A substantial number also went to Ireland and, in the early years of the reign of James I who acceded to the throne in 1603, many Frenchmen obtained grants of naturalisation in Ulster. The Dublin government was happy to welcome them in the southern parts of the island, but the great mass of the population had no special sympathy for them. The disturbed sta

    The disturbed state of the country made it unattractive to the immigrants, but the English government saw in the settlement of Huguenots a means of giving Ireland prosperity and strengthening the Protestant element within the population.

    Louis XIV came to the French throne in 1643. The Edict of Nantes was guaranteed still, until Cardinal Mazarin died in 1661. Then the persecution of Huguenots began in earnest again. Charles II had just come to the throne of England and during his reign more refugees were sent to Ireland at the expense of the government. In 1674 the Irish parliament passed an act offering letters of naturalisation to the refugees and free admission to all corporations. Under the Duke of Ormond’s vice-royalty, colonies of Huguenot refugees were planted at Dublin, Cork, Kilkenny, Lisburn and Waterford. The settlement of Portarlington gained special protection under the Marquis de Ruvigny. The refugee movement was at its height when the revocation of the Edict of Nantes occurred on 8th October 1685. This resulted in the flight of some 200,000 Huguenots. Over 40,000 went to England and 10,000 went to Ireland.

    Dr. Alice St Ledger of Cork an expert on the Huguenots has drawn my attention to the following ‘According to Grace L. Lee’s ‘The Huguenot Settlements in Ireland’, the Duclos family came to Ireland before 1685.  They came from Metz in the Department of the Moselle (north-east France).’

    In Bennet’s history of Bandon 1869, there is a reference to Richard Goodman who in 1692 succeeded the Rev. Paul Duclos as vicar of Ballymodan, Bandon.
    In Raymond Hylton’s book ‘Ireland’s Huguenots and their Refuge 1662-1745′ he suggests that among the Huguenot families worshiping at the Collegiate Church in Youghal, East Cork in 1730 were the Duclos family.

     The Dukelows in Ireland

    The Dukelows could have arrived in Southern Ireland around this time and settled in county Cork. There is a story that a Catholic priest from the south of France by the name of Duclos arrived or was shipwrecked off the coast of Cork in the mid-seventeenth century. He founded a parish and started a family. Dukelows also appear in Ulster.

    Generally, the Huguenots who settled in Ireland quickly established a reputation for creative and skilled workmanship. Hard work was regarded as a self discipline and a means of averting temptation. This produced Huguenot traits of reverence, chastity, sobriety, frugality, honesty and excellence. These refugees often combined their talent of science and craftmanship by making mathematical instruments, watches, textiles, glass, paper, agricultural products and manufactured goods. Huguenot weavers laid the foundation and developed the Irish linen and poplin industries.

    By 1800, descendants of the original Huguenots had integrated into Irish Society and were virtually assimilated by the Church of Ireland. In the process, the name Duclos must have been anglicized to Dukelow. Names were often spelt in different ways and Irish or English clerks who did not understand French would have written down what they thought was correct.

    There is a Memoriala of a deed of 1727, (No 47499) where Peter Duklow servant of John Nash Senior of Brinny, Co. Cork is noted as a witness. This is near Innishannon which at the time had a Hugnenot community and the Christian name Peter is noteworthy. Tradition has it that the first Dukelows came to Durrus via the Bernards later the Earl of Bandon family. At the time they had purchased the lands from the Evansons who were still the landlords and the Bandon Estate did not go into occupation until the 1850s. Still thee maybe a connection. In the early 19th century before the present village of Durrus was built it was referred to as a colony of weavers.

    In 1818 Thomas Dukelow married Frances Coughlan of Upper Clashadoo (farm now occupied by Johnson family). It is probable that she was the granddaughter of Jeremy (or Jeremiah) Coughlan of Carrigmanus, on the Mizen Peninsula. In 1730 he and his brother-in-law, Nathaniel Evanson, who lived nearby were paying rent to the Bernards of Bandon for a number of townlands. The Coghlanas were a little unusual as an old Gaelic Family they were Church of Ireland by 1600 and had a line of small landowners and clergymen. It is likely that this line of the Dukelows and by inference a lot of the neighboring families have ancestors who were on the Mizen and Muintervara for upwards of 3,000 years.

    The earliest known Dukelow in our family tree is a Richard Dukelow. Richard was probably born between 1795 and 1805. Around the time of his birth, the population of Ireland began to explode due to the abundance of incredibly cheap food. By 1841 the Irish population was nearly 8.25 million and it was the most densely populated country in Europe. Young couples married early as no savings were necessary. A cabin was erected for little or nothing in a few days and children were a necessity as an insurance against destitution in old age as there was no Poor Law until 1838. The family cabin was usually warmed by a turf fire and, even though the Irish peasant may have slept on the floor, there was plenty of food, potato being the mainstay of Irish cooking. The pre-famine Irish may have been poor but they were not gloomy. Dancing and talking were universal diversions.

    Richard Dukelow

    • Richard’s parents have not been identified, but he could have been related to ‘Big Pete’ Dukelow. Legend has it that he was the biggest man in the county at 7’6″. He supposedly had one or two brothers and Richard could be descended from one of these.

      Looking at the incidence of certain names in the family tree, it is suspected that Richard’s birthplace was Durrus, which is located about 7 miles from Bantry Bay in County Cork.

      In the Tithe Applotment for the Durrus Tithe for 16th November 1830 two Richard Dukelows are mentioned: one in Droumatinahine and one in Rossmore. In Crotties there was also a Charles, Peter, James and Robert Dukelow and a Thomas in Classadoo.

      As regards the identity of Richard’s wife, three names have cropped up in research. According to the Irish Records Extraction Database at Ancestry.com, a Richard Dukelow married a Catherine King in the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Co Cork in 1814. A Richard Duclow married a Sarah Williamson in 1830 also in the Diocese of Cork & Ross, Co Cork. Another possibility was Avis Shannon who married a Richard Dukelow. The main contender appears to be Catherine King. The marriage to Sarah Williamson is rather late and Avis Shannon was later found in the US in the 1860 census, so they are less likely.

      In terms of occupation, he is named as a labourer on his son’s marriage certificate (1859), but it is not stated whether this was an agricultural or industrial labourer. The strongest evidence is that he was an agricultural labourer, as his son or grandson, John Dukelow, is reported to have scared crows off the crops as a boy for a penny. On his daughter’s marriage certificate (1861) his occupation is a butcher. It is possible he was a tenant farmer to begin with and then left the land during the potato famines in the 1840’s. By this time, Richard and his wife appear to have had at least 3 children: John was born first in around 1828. Peter was born between 1832 and 1834 and Mary followed in around 1834. There may have also been an Anne, born around 1840.

      The Potato Famine

      Local failures of the potato crop had occurred regularly since the 1700s. There had been ‘minor’ famines in 1817 and 1822 and the possibility of another failure in 1845 caused no particular alarm. In fact, at the beginning of July of that year, the crop promised to be a bumper one. However, the first news that the blight which had recently ravaged the North American potato crop had crossed the Atlantic came from the Isle of Wight, where disease had appeared.

      Suddenly, every plant died and, soon afterward, all over Ireland people were dying by the thousand. The situation was exacerbated by another failure in 1846. Starvation was soon followed by disease. Some people were said to die by the fences and about 40 dead persons were reputedly eaten by dogs in Durrus. Cart loads of corpses were buried in mass graves.
      Before the potato failure, to leave Ireland had been regarded as the most terrible of fates, but now the people began to flee en masse. It is estimated that a total of a million emigrants went to North America. By the 1840′s as a direct result of the famine half of all immigrants to the United States originated from Ireland. Many of these immigrants went to the largest cities, especially Boston and New York City, as well as Chicago, San Francisco, Hartford, Albany, Philadelphia and Detroit. Even today, many of these cities still retain a substantial Irish-American community while New York City still has more people who claim Irish heritage than Dublin’s whole population. These cities became the conduit through which Irish, both Protestant and Catholic entered American society.
      However, there was an even larger emigration across the Irish Channel to Great Britain, to Liverpool, Glasgow and the ports of South Wales. There is one story of a ship arriving in Newport, Wales and a great debate raging as to whether the Irish should be allowed ashore as they would spread pestilence throughout Britain.

      By February 1848 there were 191residents from Durrus in the Bantry Workhouse. Pre famine the population was 3731 in 1841. By 1851 it had dropped to 2003. The number of houses went from 595 to 324.

      Ireland’s Valuation office conducted its first survey of property ownership in Ireland from 1848 to 1864. This survey became known as “Griffiths Valuation” after Richard Griffith who was the director of the office at that time. The survey was used to determine the amount of tax each person should pay towards the support of the poor within their poor law union. This involved determining the value of all privately held lands and buildings in rural as well as urban areas to figure the rate at which each unit of property could be rented year after year. The resulting survey was arranged by barony and civil parish with an index to the townlands appearing in each volume. Griffith’s Valuation can be used as an excellent census substitute for the years after the Great Famine as censuses prior to 1901 were destroyed.

      In the Griffiths Report of 1850-1852, there is only one Richard Dukelow in Carrigboy alongside an Avesia Dukelow who may have been a sister or mother. Incidentally, the name Avesia is repeated amongst the Dukelows of Durrus.

      Inspection of the Irish Reproductive Loan Fund Records reveals that this Richard had fallen on hard times. The Irish Reproductive Loan Fund was a micro credit scheme set up in 1824 to provide small loans to the ‘industrious poor’. Local associations and committees administered the scheme, most often from a small town in a rural area, and county committees oversaw their work. The records of the local associations and county committees are in the The National Archives and cover the years 1824 to 1846 for county Cork. As well as the notes of security for the loans, there are loan ledgers, repayment books and defaulters’ books. The minimum information supplied is address and occupation, but much additional detail is often given in the local association records, including notes on health, family circumstances and emigration. A Richard Dukelow is mentioned. He borrowed 2 pounds on 23rd March 1846. It was secured by Michael Baker of Cruttees, John Dukelow of Aghagouma and Michael Hurley of Ballycomane. It is interesting to note that the Hurley (or Hurely /Herley) family crop up later alongside the Dukelows in Well Street, Poplar, Middlesex, England in the 1861 census. By 26th November 1849, Richard had paid off 14 shillings of the loan, still owed 1pound and 6 shillings and owed interest of 2d. The Constable in charge of administering the loans was called upon to find out his circumstances and Richard appears not to have been in a position to repay the loan. Records state that “He did reside here (in Cruttees) Being poor man Resides at present in Carrigboy being poorly circumstances”. At the some time, others on the same sheet were heading to America and were poor farmers.

      It is interesting to note that John Dukelow, a shoemaker of Aghagouna also borrowed 2 pounds on 26th October 1846 which was secured by Charles Dukelow and Timothy Daly of Rossmore. By 26th November 1849, he had paid 8s. He lived in Aghagouna on both dates according to the records. Maybe Richard and John were brothers.

      Other Dukelows mentioned in the Griffiths Valuation for Cork are:

      Dukelow Peter Dromreagh Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Peter Arderrawinny Skull Cork
      Dukelow Mary Rossmore Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Thomas Clashadoo Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Thomas Ballydehob Skull Cork
      Dukelow William Brahalish Durrus Cork
      Dukelow John Clashadoo Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Charles Crottees Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Charles Coomkeen Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Charles Dromataniheen Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Charles Dromataniheen Durrus Cork
      Dukelow Charles Rusgeenaniska Durrus Cork
      2 Jason Dukelows Crottees Durrus Cork

      It is highly likely that some of these are Richard’s relatives.

      After 5 or 6 generations in Ireland, the potato famines prompted the Dukelows to migrate for a second time. In the 1820/1830/1840 US Federal census there were no Dukelows, but, by the time of the 1850 census, there were two: one in Wisconsin and one in Monroe, New York. From 1860 onwards their numbers in the US swelled.

      Of the 22 Dukelows in the 1860 US Federal census, one family of seven lived in New York, one family of three in Middlesex, one lived in Queens (aged 17) and eleven Dukelows lived in Calumet. In the 1870 US census there were 37 Dukelows and in the 1880 census there were over 100. Their birthplaces varied, but were mostly Canada, Ireland and just three from England.

      The details of Richard’s life and his exact fate may never be known, but there may be some clues in the records available. No Richard Dukelows were uncovered in the 1841, 1851, 1861 or 1871 census in England or 1841 and 1851 census for Wales, Scotland and Channel Islands. There are none in the 1840 US Federal Census or in the 1851 census of East and West Canada, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. There is a Richard Dukelow born approximately 1833, living in Wankesha, Wisconsin in the 1850 USA Federal census. He was working as a labourer on a farm, but he is too young to be relevant. All the evidence points to him remaining in Ireland. He may well have died impoverished and be one of the millions buried in mass graves during the height of the famine. No matching gravestone or death record has been uncovered anywhere.

      Richard’s Sons

      His children were definitely part of the exodus from Ireland. By the 1850’s they had migrated to the British Isles.

      The trip to the UK was the flight of the very poor that could not raise enough money for a passage to the States or Canada. Crossing to Great Britain was a familiar experience for thousands of Irish, thanks to seasonal harvest work and the demand for labour associated with the Industrial Revolution. Large Irish communities had been established in the cities thanks to the labourers (navvies) who had gone over to dig docks and canals and to work in mills and factories. They provided cheap labour and were often used for strike breaking. In addition, the conclusion of various colonial campaigns meant large numbers of Irish soldiers were discharged onto the frequently unwelcoming streets of London. There were regular services of steamers on a daily basis between Liverpool and Cork.

      Richard’s children are thought to have entered Britain through the ports of South Wales, as his grandson, John, is known to have worked there for many years. From Wales, many Irish spread over England and Wales, afraid of returning to starvation. Chepstow and Cheltenham on the English border were invaded by the Irish in particular.

      The brothers may well have arrived in London around 1852 when the Poplar Docks were opened, followed by the Royal Victoria Docks in 1855. As a large part of the workforce simply required brute strength to fetch and carry goods, employment was open to anyone, and the poor immigrants from Ireland provided cheap labour.

      Their living conditions were awful. Because of London’s high cost of living, several Irish families frequently shared a single room, and when this overcrowding was combined with primitive sewage arrangements, poor ventilation, and few opportunities for washing of either bodies or clothes, the mortality rate among London’s Irish population rose to frightening levels.

      By 1859, Richard’s two sons, Peter and John, had found their way to London, and were living amongst these Irish migrants. I am sure they would have already known many from home. Peter married Hannah Collins in 1859 and John was a witness. At the time of the 1861 census, John was lodging with his Poplar-born wife, Mary, next door to his brother at 9 Well Street, Poplar. Their surname appears as Dupelow. They were both working as dock labourers.

      It is evident from Peter’s marriage certificate that neither of them could read nor write. This was the norm at the time. The percentage of males who could read and write in the 1841 Census for Durrus was between 15 and 19%.

      Having survived the famines, it must have come as a shock when John Dukelow died suddenly on 10th August 1866 whilst he was living at 4 Providence Place, Poplar, which was very close to Well Street. He had contracted cholera, which he had had for 23 hours. There was a major cholera epidemic in London July to October 1866. This followed epidemics in 1832, 1848-49, and 1853-4. Thinking that the disease was spread by the inhalation of invisible noxious gases emitted by excrement and rotting waste, sanitary reformers tried to prevent the spread of cholera by flushing sewers and washing down streets to eliminate the disease. Cholera is primarily water-borne, and the first effect of the cleansing was to make the 1848-49 epidemics even worse than that of 1832. The distribution of deaths in successive cholera epidemics reflected the cleanliness of the water supply in different parts of London and, in 1866, only Poplar was affected with a death rate of 81-160 deaths per 10,000 inhabitants.

      Republicanism
      It is possible that the Dukelows were sympathetic to the ideals of Irish Republicanism. This is based on various pieces of evidence. Firstly, they originated from an area which was the heartland of the Fenian movement. The Fenians were members of the so-called Fenian movement in Ireland and elsewhere, though primarily America and England. They wanted one simple desire for Ireland – independence from British rule. The Great Famine had a massive impact on Ireland. Some in Ireland believed that the government in London – to solve the ‘Irish Problem’ – had deliberately done as little as possible to aid the people of Ireland – a form of genocide – and these people concluded that the only hope Ireland had for its future was a complete separation from Great Britain. If London was unwilling to grant this, then the Fenians would fight for it.
      Anger against the British government spilled over in 1848. In this year a group of revolutionaries known as Young Ireland launched an uprising against the government. It was a failure. One member of Young Ireland went onto form the secret society that became known as the Irish Republican Brotherhood. Its aim was independence for Ireland. Another went to American and became the leader of a new organisation called the Fenian Brotherhood. It took its name from the Fianna who were a band of Irish warriors of the 2nd and 3rd centuries. The name ‘Fenians’ became an umbrella term to cover all the groups associated with wanting independence for Ireland. By the very nature of what they wanted, those elements within the Fenian movement who were prepared to use violence to advance their cause had to remain secret.
      There was an attempted uprising in 1867, though it was a failure. The ‘uprising’ was led by Thomas Kelly who had fought in the American Civil War. Kelly did not base himself in Ireland but in London. Here he gained support from the large Irish community that had come to the city during the Great Famine. In December 1867, several Londoners were killed when a bomb planted by the Fenians exploded at Clerkenwell Prison. This caused a wave of anti-Irish feeling in London and elsewhere in England.

      Against this backdrop, the Dukelows in England are known to have associated with and married into nationalist families such as the Santrys and Swantons. This repeated intertwining of Cork families naturally assumes a common political standpoint. John Dukelow’s death was notified by a Margaret Sawtry/Santry of 51 Wells Street, Poplar. Michael Collins, who played a pivotal role in Irish affairs, leading to the treaty of 1921 that gave Ireland dominion status within the British Empire, was introduced to these ideals by an Irish village blacksmith by the name of James Santry. His background indicates that he could even be related distantly to family member Hannah Collins, wife of Peter Dukelow (stevedore) mentioned later. Generations of Dukelows and Swantons had intermarried in Ireland and would continue to do so in London. In the 1871 census a Mary Santry was found lodging with the Swantons who were known to have strong associations with the Irish Brigade, a nationalist group that pre-dated the famine and supplied manpower for many conflicts with Britain such as the American civil war.

      Across the Atlantic and in spite of their protestant outlook, Dukelows who immigrated to America are known to have been instrumental in forming an Irish political group in New York called ’99 cousins’. This group was the subject of a newspaper article in Rochester, New York and identified strongly with the historic Catholic experience, the nationalist political agenda, and possibly the more militant republican agenda.

      The most compelling piece of evidence comes directly from Richard Dukelow’s grandson, Peter, who scribed some notes on The Committee of Spanish Bondholders letterhead at the beginning of the 1900s. They talk of the Irish Brigade and a peasant called Thomas Parr. The reason for these historical notes is unclear, but suggest an interest in Irish history and the plight of the poor and oppressed. His reference to the Treaty of Limerick and the end of the Irish resistance to William III displays pro-Irish nationalist sympathies. In this regard, he would not have been alone, Irish poet W B Yeats was protestant and also a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, a secret oath-bound military organization devoted to achieving an independent Ireland. Peter can hardly be blamed for any pro-independence leanings as the Great Famine would have left deep scars in his family. No doubt, as a young boy he would have heard about the misery of the famine and been familiar with such songs as ‘Black ’47’, named after the most severe year of the famine.

      The deaths, the misery, rural depopulation, indifference of the British government and the near-extinction of the Irish culture and language, made the Great Famine undisputedly a pivot point in the history of Ireland and the Dukelow family.

      In 1937 the National Schools in Ireland asked the children to collect local folklore rom the older people in the area, the results are in the University College Dublin archives and some are on line, included are the following contributions from Kathleen, Sarah, Winnie and Annie Dukelow from Durrus.

      Takes a little while to open.

      Dukelow School Folklore Collection 1937

      discussion about George Nicholson under post “Elizabeth Nicholson’s Family.]

    Interconnected Families – A Shared Faith Community

    John and Elizabeth Dukelow (Thomas’ parents) were one family of a cluster of Protestant families that were tightly interconnected. Catholic tenant farmers dominated the population in much of County Cork, Ireland. But, as a result of some artifacts of ancient land ownership rights, there was a small concentrated group of Protestants tenant farmers in far western side of Cork. Because of so few Protestants families around them, these families formed a tight and complex social network with each other. Nearly all the Protestant families there were either related by blood or by marriage. These inter-family complexities occurred for many generations, with the subculture reinforced by Penal Laws (see the History Back Drop on Penal Laws). From the outside this group appeared to be one large extended family. Family names in this cluster included the Swantons, Goods, Roycrafts, Loves, Youngs, and likely also included the Gallaghers and Nicholsons.

    These strong inter-family relationships continued when families emigrated from Ireland to New York State and held fast as some families from this cluster eventually settled in Wisconsin.

    One example of this interconnectedness is revealed around the Christening and eventual wedding of Thomas and Elizabeth’s first born, Mary Ann. Mary Ann’s baptismal sponsor when she was three months old was Thomas Good. Twenty-two years later, the same Thomas Good became her father-in-law! Mary Ann married Frank Good, son of Thomas Good, in the year 1865. This wedding appears to have been an “arranged” marriage. Mary Ann lived in Dodge County and Frank lived in Dane County. This distance of 60 or more miles was a major obstacle to romance in the 1860s! Imagine the effort it took to travel that distance (and back) by horse. Frank and Mary Ann had only met each other two or perhaps three times before their wedding. However, they apparently got along well as there marriage lasted over 59 years!

    The strong inter-family relationships also became a part of the political picture in Rochester New York during the 1800s. The Dukelow family was part of what was labeled the “99 Cousins” which controlled much the Rochester City government in the 1840s and 1850s. More on what were called the “99 Cousins” will be discussed later.

    Thomas and Elizabeth’s son John T married twice. His second marriage in 1904 may be some of the last vestiges of this closely connected extended family group. John’s marriage, at age 57 is to his first cousin, Kathryn Nicholson, age 37. Kathryn is Elizabeth’s niece, daughter of Elizabeth’s brother George Nicholson [see separate discussion about George Nicholson under post "Elizabeth Nicholson's Family.]

    • (See also Dukelow Family History part 2)

      about 10 months ago

      In Mazier Brady’s history of the Dioceses of Cork, Volume 1, p 73 dealing with the Parish of Desertmore he places Paul Duclos as Rector in 1689 and also P. Island, Ross.  Originally from Metz in France.

      http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/batch2/bradyvol1/#/144/From Jeff Dukelow’s web site

    From Ginnie Swanton site
    In the site irishgenealogy.ie are the church records for the Catholic parish of Muintervara (Durrus?kilcrohane). the following Dukelows are mentioned. There are other Dukelows (Duckloo/Duckloo) mentioned for Schull East, Bantry, Allihies
    Date Child Parents Sponsors Townland
    15th February 1832 Jeremiah Shea Cornelius Shea Mary Ducloo Thomas Brien Catherine Hurly Crutties/Crotties
    13th March 1843 Richard Duckloo John DucklooEllen Murray DL Moony Anne Ducloo Classadoo/Clashadoo

Dukelow photographs Durrus c1910

Census Ireland 1901, 1911

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Surname Forename Townland/Street DED County Age Sex Birthplace Occupation Religion Literacy Irish Language Relation to Head of Household Marital Status Specified Illnesses
Dukelow
William
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 15 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Mary
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 12 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Peter
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 22 M County Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Avesia
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 14 F County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Jane
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 6 F County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Cannot read or write Daughter
Dukelow
John
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 6 M Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Richard
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 2 M Co Cork Church of Ireland Cannot read Son Not Married
Dukelow
John
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 35 M Co Cork Farm Servant Church of Ireland Read and write Brother Not Married
Dukelow
Charlie
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 22 M Co Cork Farmer Son Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
William
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 17 M Co Cork Farmers Son Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Sarah
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 10 F Co Cork Scholar Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Annie
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 19 F Co Cork General Servant Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Thomas
Crottees Durrus West Cork 8 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write English Son
Dukelow
Richard
Crottees Durrus West Cork 72 M County Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Can read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Anne
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 20 F Co Cork Farmer Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Jane
Crottees Durrus West Cork 72 F County Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Irish and English Mother in Law Widow
Dukelow
Jane
Crottees Durrus West Cork 14 F County Cork Scholar Church Ireland Read and write English Daughter
Dukelow
Charles
Crottees Durrus West Cork 38 M County Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Can read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Margaret
Crottees Durrus West Cork 22 F County Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Can read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Kate
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 39 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Margaret
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 80 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Irish and English Mother Widow
Dukelow
William
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 43 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Thomas
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 22 M Co Cork “Farmer’s Son” Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Susan
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 20 F Co Cork “Farmer’s Daughter” Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
William
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 49 M Co Cork Farmer Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Widower
Dukelow
Madge
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 15 F Co Cork Scholar Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Frances
Crottees Durrus West Cork 16 F County Cork Farmers Daughter Church Ireland Read and write English Daughter
Dukelow
John
Crottees Durrus West Cork 9 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write English Son
Dukelow
Kate
Crottees Durrus West Cork 50 F Church Ireland Read and write Wife
Dukelow
Bertia
Crottees Durrus West Cork 16 M Scholar Church Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Charles
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 51 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Eliza
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 19 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Mary Anne
Carrigrohane Ballincollig Cork 27 F Co Cork House and Parlour Maid Domestic Church of Ireland Read and write Servant Not Married
Dukelow
Richard
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 58 M County Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Sarah
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 46 F County Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Margaret
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 10 F County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Frances
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 49 F Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Mary
Crottees Durrus West Cork 12 F County Cork Scholar Church Ireland Read and write English Daughter
Dukelow
Peter
Crottees Durrus West Cork 64 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Katie
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 22 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Ann
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 1 F County Cork Church of Ireland Cannot read or write Daughter
Dukelow
Margaret
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 4 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Cannot read Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Anne
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 37 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Allan
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 24 M Co Cork “Farmer’s Son” Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Richard
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 12 M Co Cork Scholar Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Sarah
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 50 F Co Cork Farmers Wife Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Wife Married
Dukelow
Mary
Crottees Durrus West Cork 40 F County Cork Church of Ireland Read and write English Wife Married
Dukelow
Robert
Crottees Durrus West Cork 0 M Co Cork Church of Ireland Cannot read Son
Dukelow
Ursulla
Crottees Durrus West Cork 56 F County Cork Farmer’s Wife Church of Ireland Can read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Johon
Crottees Durrus West Cork 11 M Scholar Church Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
James
Rossmarc Durrus West Cork 50 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Richard
Blackrock Road Cork Urban No. 5 Cork 19 M County Cork, Ireland Farmers Son Church of Ireland Can read and write Not Married
Dukelow
Anne
Patrick Street (part) No. 2 Urban Cork 29 F Co Cork Teacher General Ch of Ireland Read and write Boarder Not Married
Dukelow
Fanny
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 47 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Fanny
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 21 F Co Cork Grocers Clerk Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Ursulla
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 22 F County Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Eliza
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 15 F County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Charles
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 52 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
James
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 60 M Co Cork Farmer Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Robert
Crottees Durrus West Cork 48 M County Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Charles
Crottees Durrus West Cork 17 M County Cork Farmers Son Church Ireland Read and write English Son
Dukelow
Arthur
Crottees Durrus West Cork 13 M Scholar Church Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Charles
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 55 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Married
Dukelow
William
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 21 M Co Cork Farmer Son Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Jane
Marino Street Bantry Cork 90 F Co Cork Wesleyan Read and write Mother Widow
Dukelow
Samuel
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 17 M County Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Paul
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 12 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Richard
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 40 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Maggie
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 10 F Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Elcie
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 11 F Co Cork Scholar Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Ursula
Crottees Durrus West Cork 5 F County Cork Church of Ireland Cannot read English Daughter
Dukelow
Eliza
Crottees Durrus West Cork 18 F Domestic Church Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
James
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 65 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Irish and English Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Kate
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 58 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Thomas
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 18 M Co Cork Farmer Son Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Margeret
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 17 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Minnie
Marino Street Bantry Cork 37 F Co Cork Wesleyan Cannot read Sister Not Married Idiot
Dukelow
William
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 9 M Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Elizabeth
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 4 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Sophy
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 18 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Robert
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 16 M Co Cork Farmers Son Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Alice
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 14 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
James
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 9 M Co Cork Scholar Protestant Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Harry
Crottees Durrus West Cork 26 M Farmers Son Church Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Eliza
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 50 F Co Cork Farmer Wife Church of Ireland Read and write English Wife Married
Dukelow
John
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 14 M Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Not Married
Dukelow
Susan
Rossmarc Durrus West Cork 50 F Co Cork Farmer’s Wife Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Thomas
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 66 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
John
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 40 M Co Cork Farmer’s Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Robert
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 20 M Co Cork Farmer’s Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Eliza
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 65 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Avesia
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 15 F County Cork Farmer’s Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Peter
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 7 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Richard
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 5 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Cannot read Son Not Married
Dukelow
Charles
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 2 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Cannot read Son Not Married
Dukelow
Mary
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 37 F County Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married
Dukelow
Ursulla
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 14 F County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Not Married
Dukelow
Peter
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 44 M County Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
William
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 12 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Son Not Married
Dukelow
Samuel
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 10 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write

Surname Forename Townland/Street DED County Age Sex
Dukelow
Robert
Ballydaniel Kilmacdonagh Cork 30 M
Dukelow
Lizzie
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 22 F
Dukelow
William
Nohoval Nohaval Cork 26 M
Dukelow
Ellen Mary
Grattan Square Dungarvan No. 1 Waterford 25 F
Dukelow
Frances Mary
Grattan Square Dungarvan No. 1 Waterford 0 F

1911 Census
Surname Forename Townland/Street DED County Age Sex Birthplace Occupation Religion Literacy Irish Language Relation to Head of Household Marital Status Specified Illnesses Years Married Children Born Children Living
Dukelow
Sarag
Belmont Road Victoria (part of) Down 19 F Co Cork General Servant Church of Ireland Read and write Servant Single
Dukelow
Richard
Gurteeniher Dromdaleague South Cork 62 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Visitor Widower
Dukelow
Ursula
Gurteeniher Dromdaleague South Cork 32 F Co Cork Farmer’s Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Visitor Single
Dukelow
Maggie
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 27 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Willie
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 24 M Co Cork Farmer Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Minnie
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 22 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Robert
Cahilville Cottages Cork No. 3 Urban Cork 38 M Cork W R Constable R J Constabulery Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Charles
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 61 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Lizzie
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 29 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Frances
Elizabeth Terrace Cork No. 5 Urban (part of) Cork 3 F Cork City Church of Ireland Cannot Read Daughter Single
Dukelow
Mary
Elizabeth Terrace Cork No. 5 Urban (part of) Cork 2 F Cork City Church of Ireland Cannot Read Daughter Single
Dukelow
Fanny
Dunbittern West Bantry Rural Cork 56 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 32 5 5
Dukelow
W
Buttevant Town Buttevant Cork 19 M England Laberour Roman Catholic Read and write Single
Dukelow
Mary
Elizabeth Terrace Cork No. 5 Urban (part of) Cork 24 F Co cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 4 2 2
Dukelow
Mary
Gurteenaspig, part of (Rural) Bishopstown Cork 55 F Co Cork Private Means Roman Catholic Read and write Head of Family Widow
Dukelow
Paul
Main Street Skibbereen Urban Cork 22 M Co Cork Hardware Assistant Church of Ireland Read and write Boarder
Dukelow
Mary
North Street Skibbereen Urban Cork 38 F Co Cork Methodist Cannot read Relative Single
Dukelow
William
Ballyvorane Nohaval Cork 32 M Co Cork Farm Labourer Church of Ireland Read write English Farm Servant Single
Dukelow
Robert
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 27 M County Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Thomas
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 76 M County Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married Blind 52
Dukelow
Elizabeth
Arderrawinny Lowertown Cork 75 F County Cork Farmers Wife Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 52 9 9
Dukelow
Allan
Elizabeth Terrace Cork No. 5 Urban (part of) Cork 35 M Co cork Store clerk Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
John
Gurteenaspig, part of (Rural) Bishopstown Cork 22 M Co Cork Chemist’s Assistant Roman Catholic Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Frances
John’s Street Wexford Urban No 1 Wexford 10 F Co Wexford Scholar Roman Catholic Read and write Grand daughter Single
Dukelow
Peter
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 55 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Can read and write Head of Family Married 27 8 8
Dukelow
Robert
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 9 M Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Can read and write Son Single
Dukelow
John
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 16 M Co Cork Farmer’s Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Annie
Crottees Durrus West Cork 39 F County Cork Farmers Wife Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 9 2 2
Dukelow
Robert
Crottees Durrus West Cork 58 M Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Mary
Crottees Durrus West Cork 51 F Cork Church of Ireland Read and write English Wife Married 28 8 8
Dukelow
Jane
Crottees Durrus West Cork 22 F Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Single
Dukelow
Annie
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 38 F Co Cork Farmer Member Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Single
Dukelow
Richard
Coolcoulaghta Durrus East Cork 15 M Co Cork WK Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Brother Single
Dukelow
Samual
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 27 M Co Cork WK Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Brother Single
Dukelow
Elizabeth
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 25 F Co Cork WK Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Sister Single
Dukelow
Maggie
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 20 F Co Cork Farmer’s Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Susannah
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 26 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Single
Dukelow
Charlie L
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 8 M Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Grand Son Single
Dukelow
James
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 41 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married 41 12 11
Dukelow
Madgie
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 24 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Richard
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 22 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Robert
Crottees Durrus West Cork 10 M Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Single
Dukelow
John
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 20 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
John
Rossmore Durrus West Cork 45 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married 8
Dukelow
James
Rossmore Durrus West Cork 60 M Co Cork Retired Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Brother Married
Dukelow
Anne
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 50 F Co Cork Farmer’s Wife Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 22 4 2
Dukelow
Kate
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 49 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 20 5 4
Dukelow
Margaret
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 14 F Co Cork Farmer’s Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Thomas
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 28 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Single
Dukelow
Sarah
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 66 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife ? 41 12 11
Dukelow
William
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 27 M Co Cork Farmer’s Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Richard John
Crottees Durrus West Cork 5 M County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Cannot read Son
Dukelow
Richard
Crottees Durrus West Cork 81 M County Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Father Married 52
Dukelow
Ursula
Crottees Durrus West Cork 14 F Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Single
Dukelow
Charles
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 68 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Thomas
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 25 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Madgie
Rossmore Durrus West Cork 7 F Co Cork Schollar Church of Ireland Read write Daughter Single
Dukelow
William John
Coolcoulaghta Durrus East Cork 22 M Co Cork WK Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Single
Dukelow
Jane
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 16 F Co Cork WK Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Sister Single
Dukelow
Lily
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 14 F Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Peter
Crottees Durrus West Cork 72 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Widower 41 9 9
Dukelow
Henery
Crottees Durrus West Cork 34 M Co Cork Farmer’s Son Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Single
Dukelow
Charles
Crottees Durrus West Cork 60 M County Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married 9 2 2
Dukelow
John
Crottees Durrus West Cork 19 M Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Single
Dukelow
Elizia
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 64 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 32 10 3
Dukelow
Anne
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 11 F Co Cork WK Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Sister Single
Dukelow
William
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 53 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Herbert P
Crottees Durrus West Cork 25 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write English Son Single
Dukelow
Elizabeth
Crottees Durrus West Cork 26 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write English Daughter Single
Dukelow
Jamesic
Rossmore Durrus West Cork 5 M Co Cork Schollar Church of Ireland Cannot read Son Single
Dukelow
Sarah Anne
Rossmore Durrus West Cork 1 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Cannot read Daughter Single
Dukelow
Law
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 20 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Can read and write Son Single
Dukelow
William
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 19 M Co Cork Farmer’s Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Charles
Clashadoo Durrus West Cork 69 M Co Cork Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write English Head of Family Married 40 6 5
Dukelow
Robert
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 26 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Cella
Crottees Durrus West Cork 9 F County Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read Daughter Single
Dukelow
Annie
Dromataniheen Durrus West Cork 27 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Isabella
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 24 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Can read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
Peter
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 17 M Co Cork Shopman Stacer Church of Ireland Can read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Richard
Brahalish Durrus West Cork 12 M Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Elcie
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 21 F Co Cork Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Daughter Single
Dukelow
James
Coomkeen Durrus West Cork 20 M Co Cork Farmers Son Church of Ireland Read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Maria
Rossmore Durrus West Cork 38 F Co Cork Church of Ireland Read and write Wife Married 8 3 3
Dukelow
Mary Anne
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 47 F Co Cork Farmers Wife Church of Ireland Can read and write Wife Married 27 8 8
Dukelow
Charles
Derrycarhoon Ballybane Cork 12 M Co Cork Scholar Church of Ireland Can read and write Son Single
Dukelow
Evesia
Coolcoulaghta Durrus East Cork 25 F Co Cork WK Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Sister Single
Dukelow
Peter
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 32 M Co Cork WK Farmer Church of Ireland Read and write Head of Family Single
Dukelow
Avesia
Dromreagh Durrus East Cork 24 F Co Cork WK Farmers Daughter Church of Ireland Read and write Sister

Dukelow
Patrick Joseph
Coolnamuck Road No. 1 Carrickbeg Urban Tipperary 2 M Co Waterford Roman Catholic Cannot read Son Single
Dukelow
Francis
Coolnamuck Road No. 1 Carrickbeg Urban Tipperary 40 M Co Cork Constable R I C Roman Catholic Read and write Head of Family Married
Dukelow
Ellen M
Coolnamuck Road No. 1 Carrickbeg Urban Tipperary 36 F Co Wexford Roman Catholic Read and write Wife Married 11 6 6

Area – DUBLIN (RC) , Parish/Church/Congregation – ST. MARY, PRO CATHEDRAL

Baptism of JOSEPH O NEIL LENTARGNE of N/R on 1 August 1805

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Name JOSEPH O NEIL LENTARGNE
Date of Birth N/R N/R N/R
Address N/R
Father BENJN LENTARGNE
Mother MARY THERESA
Further details in the record
Sponsor 1 VICTOR HERVIEW DUCLOS
Sponsor 2 ELIZ NUGENT
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC) , Parish/Church/Congregation – CORK – SOUTH PARISH

Marriage of WILLIAM WARD of N/R and MARY DUKLOW of N/R on 18 August 1877

Husband Wife
Name WILLIAM WARD MARY DUKLOW
Address N/R N/R
Occupation N/R N/R
Father N/R N/R
Mother N/R N/R
Name JOSEPH CASTER
Date of Birth 8 June 1866 (BASED ON OTHER DATE INFORMATION)
Address CASTLETOWN
Father WILLIAM CASTER
Mother MARGARET DUKLOW

Area – CORK & ROSS (RC) , Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA

Baptism of ELLEN CARTHY of ROCK on 17 January 1841

Name ELLEN CARTHY
Date of Birth N/R N/R N/R
Address ROCK
Father MICHL CARTHY
Mother MARY KING
Further details in the record
Child Denomination RC
Sponsor 1 THOS KING
Sponsor 2 MARGARET DUKLOW
Recorded Diocesan Area CORK & ROSS
Recorded Parochial Area DURRIS (MUINTERVARA)
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC) , Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA

Baptism of BEN DUCKLOW of GU- on 26 February 1826

Name BEN DUCKLOW
Date of Birth N/R N/R N/R
Address GU-
Father JAMES DUCKLOW
Mother CATHERINE CRONEEN
Further details in the record
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC) , Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST

Baptism of DANIEL GOGGIN of N/R on 5 May 1872

Name DANIEL GOGGIN
Date of Birth N/R N/R N/R
Address N/R
Father WILLIAM GOGGIN
Mother ELIZA DUCKLOW
Baptism, Marriage and Burial results for dukelow

Displaying results 1 – 25 of 25.

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Baptism of ANNE DUKELOW of N/R
on N/R July 1839
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of MARY DUKELOW of N/R
on 25 May 1842
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of JOHN DUKELOW of CLASSADVO
on 12 November 1850
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of CHARLES DUKELOW of CLASSADVO
on 6 January 1853
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of ROBT DUKELOW of AHAGHAMUA
on 30 July 1854
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of ELIZA DUKELOW of N/R
on 26 May 1855
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Marriage of CHARLES DUKELOW of N/R and MARYANNE SHEA of N/R
on 27 February 1838
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Marriage of RICHARD DUKELOW of N/R and MARGARET FIELD of N/R
on 26 April 1838
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Marriage of DENIS SULLIVAN of N/R and MARGARET DUKELOW of N/R
on 16 January 1846
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Marriage of WILLIAM GOGGIN of N/R and ELIZA DUKELOW of N/R
on 27 May 1855
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of ELLEN KENNA of N/R
on 24 March 1852
Parish/Church/Congregation – BANTRY
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of ELLIE MARIA of N/R
on 24 March 1852
Parish/Church/Congregation – BANTRY
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of THOMAS WARD of N/R
on 11 April 1880
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of ELLEN GOGGIN of N/R
on 31 March 1857
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of JAMES NORTH of N/R
on 23 July 1843
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL WEST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of JANE MAHONY of N/R
on 20 November 1828
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of CORNELIUS SULLIVAN of N/R
on 10 January 1846
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of PATRICK SHEEHAN of N/R
on 13 March 1846
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL EAST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of PATRICK MCCARTHY of CLASSADOO
on 8 March 1857
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of BRIDGT MAHONY of AGHAGAUNA
on 19 December 1858
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of MARTHA MAHONEY of AGHAGAUNA
on 18 October 1870
Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of ELLEN BROWN of N/R
on 8 June 1846
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL WEST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of JERRY MCCARTHY of DUNKELLY
on 27 May 1849
Parish/Church/Congregation – SCHULL WEST
Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
Baptism of TIMOTHY HARRINGTON of CLUIN
on 28 January 1860
Parish/Church/Congregation – ALLIHIES
Area – KERRY (RC)
Baptism of TIMOTHY HARRINGTON of CLUIN
on 28 January 1860
Parish/Church/Congregation – ALLIHIES
Area – KERRY (RC)

6 thoughts on “Origin Dukelow family, including Coughlan, Baker, Kingston and Williamson ancestors”

  1. Mary McCarthy Simpson said:

    Extraordinary to find my great aunt Mary Ellen Walsh and g uncle Francis Dukelow, RIC policeman in Tipp on this site! I was looking because we have Mahoney family – Cian / Keane / Charles Mahoney husband of Ellen Driscoll, of Ballycommone, Durrus and Schull. But great stuff, would love to hear from anyone else with connections to these families. I’m wondering if Francis Dukelow became a Catholic on marrying Mary Ellen most probably at her home in Wexford Town in about 1900.

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  2. we know a kathleen dukelowho is 94 she resides asutton surrey

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  3. Wow, truly astonishing research! Wish I could hire Kerry to research my Connolly and Carey lines in Schull and Bantry Bay. What I found particularly interesting was that marriages in the late 1840′s and early 50′s were early, as I had always heard that the Irish married late due to poverty.

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  4. I have information on the following entries:

    Marriage of WILLIAM WARD of N/R and MARY DUKLOW of N/R on 18 August 1877

    Husband Wife
    Name WILLIAM WARD MARY DUKLOW
    Address N/R N/R
    Occupation N/R N/R
    Father N/R N/R
    Mother N/R N/R
    —–
    Area – CORK & ROSS (RC)
    Baptism of THOMAS WARD of N/R
    on 11 April 1880
    Parish/Church/Congregation – MUINTERVARA
    —–

    The information comes from Muintervara marriage and birth records, Irish Census records of 1901 and 1911, immigration records from EllisIsland.org, and U.S. census records.
    The Muintervara birth records list two additional children. U.S. census records show many of the children living in a boarding house in Casper, Wyoming where many Muintervara emigrants settled. An Ellis Island record shows widowed Mary (Dukelow) Ward leaving Ireland in 1915 with her daughter Teresa for Casper. That record shows also that her nearest relative in Ireland was her brother P. Dukelow. The 1901 and 1911 Irish census records list the family just after the the Patrick Arundel family, indicating the proximity of the homes. Patrick (my maternal great uncle) lived (as do his granddaughters today) next to the Rusnacahara Catholic church. The Ward home has not been occupied by Wards since Mary’s World War 1 departure in 1915. The Ward children who went to Casper are Michael, Nicholas, Agnes (married John Coughlan), Teresa (married American Miflin Butler). Tess and Mifflin had no children. Aggie and Jack had 4 children (John, Mayzie born Ireland, Clem, Pauline born U.S.) These 4 had no children. All have died. It’s 99 years since Mary left Ireland; no one on Sheepshead remembers the family. Perhaps the history of a house near the church can tell us more. I realize that I’m not citing chapter and verse here, but it can be dug out of my unpublished records. I am Harry Arundel Ward, a cousin, of these Wards and the only grandchild of Henry Arundel of the Arundel Pub in Ahakista. HarryWard@outlook.com

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  5. Glen Salter said:

    Jeff Ducklow at irishtree.blogspot.com has the US history of the Dukelow/Ducklows. Also, the Connell, Salter, Attridge, and others intermarried with the Dukelows in the Schull area and in North America.

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