Cork barristers, Sir William Foster Stawell (1815-89), Oldcourt Co. Cork to Attorney General and Chief Justice, Melbourne, Redmond Barry (1815-89), Ballyclough, Co. Cork Chief Justice, Victoria, 40 hats on the Munster Circuit 1842 and not enough work for 20, and the development of Australian Legal Infrastructure

Cork barristers, Sir William Foster Stawell (1815-89), Oldcourt Co. Cork to Attorney General and Chief Justice, Melbourne, Redmond Barry (1815-89), Ballyclough, Co. Cork Chief Justice, Victoria, 40 hats on the Munster Circuit 1842 and not enough work for 20, and the development of Australian Legal Infrastructure

The Stawells were established in the Kinsale area from the early 17th century. He was a nephew of Foster Speaker of the Irish Parliament, Chancellor the Irish Exchequer and a Pro Bono Commissioner of Bogs in the 1820s.

The Barry were in Cork from the 12th century in the eastern part of the county.

Both Barry and Stawell were friendly and came from large families. Opportunities for professional advancement in Cork and Ireland were limited at the time. Various reports credited them with probity, diligence and energy both in the administration of Justice and in the wider world of public works and the arts.

Stawell:

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/stawell-sir-william-foster-4635

http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/stawell-sir-william-foster-4635

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Foster_Stawell

http://books.google.ie/books?id=X3fzrbh24RsC&pg=PR8&lpg=PR8&dq=sir+william+foster+stawell+australia&source=bl&ots=HNhsb2rTQt&sig=iqzqw67R-a1JbU0lVGpl56En-ls&hl=en&sa=X&ei=mQlMU4-dOrDb7Aax2oCgBg&ved=0CG8Q6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=sir%20william%20foster%20stawell%20australia&f=false

Barry:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redmond_Barry

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/barry-sir-redmond-2946

http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/barry-sir-redmond-2946

Cork Lawyers:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdEkxdVM0YVNzbzFHbV8tRGxNM2pmMWc&usp=drive_web#gid=0

Cork Law Students (117), Grey’s Inns, London 1600-1885.

This is taken from an online book which has significant gaps in the period covered. It may be the case that Cork student applied from an English address. Until into the 19th century there was an obligation on Irish Law Students to attend on of the Inns of Court in London (Middle Temple, Inner Temple, Linloln’s Inn, Grey’s Inns) before qualifying as a barrister.

This list is incorporated into a listing of Cork Lawyers. In the period pre 1700 names of a Norman background feature, Barry, Fitzgerald, Nagle, Roche and old Cork families Galweys (the great survivors) and Coppingers (Danish descent) the odd Gaelic name Kearney. After the settler names predominate as well as Gaelic Irish who may have made their money in business or held onto land or converted. A pattern emerges as law being a genetic inheritance, many of the same names recur over generations.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdEkxdVM0YVNzbzFHbV8tRGxNM2pmMWc&usp=drive_web#gid=0

Pre 1750 Wills, Bantry/Beara area West Cork

Pre 1750 Wills, Bantry/Beara area West Cork

Gillman’s Index to Wills Cork and Ross is available online in Cork ad present;

http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/genealogy/CPPgenealogy21oct2013/index%20_irish_wills_vol_2_cork_ross_cloyne.pdf

However the collection of Dr. Casey Vol 6 seems to contain many more including those of old Gaelic families who were dispossessed in the 17th century but whose wills in the early 17th century suggest some residual wealth. Some from the Bantry area are included here. Some of the spellings of names are to us archaic as are townland and placenames this is an attempt to regularise at times educated guesswork:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdERmc3BGbFczVFZqN0FTUkJtU1RsU2c&usp=drive_web#gid=0

Pre 1750 Wills, Skibbereen area West Cork

Pre 1750 Wills, Skibbereen area West Cork

Gillman’s Index to Wills Cork and Ross is available online in Cork ad present;

http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/genealogy/CPPgenealogy21oct2013/index%20_irish_wills_vol_2_cork_ross_cloyne.pdf

However the collection of Dr. Casey Vol 6 seems to contain many more including those of old Gaelic families who were dispossessed in the 17th century but whose wills in the early 17th century suggest some residual wealth. Some from the Skibbereen area are included here. Some of the spellings of names are to us archaic as are townland and placenames this is an attempt to regularise at times educated guesswork:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdHUxMzgzZlRZaDFrRFhsWU1BcXljY1E&usp=drive_web#gid=0

On line records of Catholic Basilica, St. Johns, New Brunswick, many Cork records including O’Sullivan from Beara Peninsula. Anglican Archives, Kingston, Ontario containing Mizen Muinter Bhaire records, and Richard John Uniacke from Cork to Nova Scotia 1755, Solicitor General, Attorney General Nova Scotia, his son James Boyle the first Prime Minister of Nova Scotia.

On line records of Catholic Basilica, St. Johns, New Brunswick, many Cork records including O’Sullivan from Beara Peninsula. Anglican Archives, Kingston, Ontario containing Mizen Muinter Bhaire records, and Richard John Uniacke from Cork to Nova Scotia 1755, Solicitor General, Attorney General Nova Scotia, his son James Boyle the first Prime Minister of Nova Scotia.
wanted to send you an unexpected resource: a source of names , parents and place of birth in Ireland from the early 19th century.

The church records of the Catholic basilica in Halifax- which are on-line
Nova Scotia, Church Records, 1720-2001, Halifax Halifax Catholic St Mary’s Basilica

here’s a page from the book 1830-1843

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-25490-1817-80?cc=1925428&wc=M6PF-CWL:219772701,219796201,219809001,219901401

which has some Sullivans from Barhaven, Co.Cork

These little registers are pretty fast going through. There is an indexing of sorts, but I found what I needed by just going flip, flip, flip.

Many thanks to Marthanne Williamson for this, she is researching the Anglican archives in Kingston Ontario That’s where she found some of the church records there was a lot more family around Prince Edward County of the neighbouring Cork families to my Williamsons, Bakers- Beamishes, Kings, Attridges, Sullivans, Hollands, Houlihans, Muligans etc


Richard John Uniacke from Cork:

The Uniacke family of Halifax and Mount Uniacke were prominent in the political, legal, religious, and social life of Nova Scotia. Richard John Uniacke, son of Norman and Alicia (Purdon) Uniacke, was born at Castletown, County Cork, Ireland and emigrated to Halifax, N.S. ca. 1755. He was lieutenant colonel of 8th Battalion, Halifax militia, and founder of the Charitable Irish Society. He held several public offices including MLA, 1783-1793, 1798-1805; speaker of the House of Assembly, 1789-1793, 1799-1805; solicitor general, 1781-1797 and attorney general, 1797-1830. In 1805 he published the third series of the Revised Statutes of Nova Scotia (1758-1804), commonly known as Uniacke’s Laws. Between 1780 and 1819, he acquired large tracts of property at Mount Uniacke, where he built his estate and farm. Uniacke married Martha Maria Delesdernier (1762-1803), daughter of Moses Delesdernier of Hillsboro, N.S., on 3 May 1775. After her death, he married Eliza (Newton), daughter of Capt. Phillip Newton, on 14 January 1808. Richard John and Martha had eleven children who survived to adulthood: 1) Norman Fitzgerald (ca. 1777-1846) m. Sophie (Delesdernier); 2) Mary (1782-1825) m. Sir Andrew Mitchell; 3) Crofton (1783-1852?) m. Dorothy (Fawson); 4) Martha Mathilda (b. 1785) m. Thomas Nickelson; 5) Alicia (1787-ca. 1840) m. William Scott; 6) Richard John (1789-1834), m. Mary Ann (Hill); 7) Elizabeth (1791-1844); 8) Anne Margaret (1793-1871) m. Capt. [Kevan] Leslie; 9) Eleanor Rebecca (1795?-1849) m. Dr. William Hacket; 10) Robert Fitzgerald (1797-1870); m. Elizabeth (Francklin); and 11) James Boyle (1800-1858), m. Rosina Jane (Black). Crofton, Richard John II and James Boyle Uniacke followed in their father’s footsteps and were active in provincial law and politics. Richard John II was acquitted in 1819 for killing William Bowie in a duel and went on to become MLA for Cape Breton Co. 1820-1830 and later puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, 1830-1834. His brother, James Boyle Uniacke, became the first premier of Nova Scotia following the institution of responsible government in 1848. Andrew Mitchell Uniacke (1808-1895), the only child of Richard John and Eliza and husband of Elizabeth (Fraser), was a barrister, MLA, 1843-1847, president of the Bank of the Nova Scotia, and chairman of

Cork Customs and Excise personnel in Cork and Worldwide.

For Cork City and Co. Cork:

http://durrushistory.wordpress.com/customs-report-1821-2-including-staffingsalaries-duties-including-cork-kinsale-youghal-baltimore-with-mention-of-bantry-crookhaven-glandore-berehaven-castletownsend-enniskeane-passage-cr/

From the 19th century many from Cork served in the Imperial Customs, in both the United Kingdom, India and China, soe are included here. This is in the process of update ad all contributions welcome at pat25a@gmail.com:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdDBkeWFQNDVDc0JzdWxYQnlyOXVaYWc&usp=drive_web#gid=0

Cork Law Students (143), Middle Temple, London, 1612-1773

There is a copy of Volume 1 of the Admission Register 1601-1781 in the Linen Hall Library, Belfast and the records have bee obtained from this source. Often the names are archaic as are placenames. Some of the student appear later in Cork records as Barristers, Attorneys and Solicitors.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqhnQGE3ANjzdEkxdVM0YVNzbzFHbV8tRGxNM2pmMWc&usp=drive_web#gid=0

Cork Lawyers, Court Personnel:

http://durrushistory.wordpress.com/2014/03/30/lawyers-court-officials-and-para-legals-co-cork-and-cork-city-from-1300/

Early Irish Lawyers:

http://durrushistory.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/lawyers-and-four-types-of-judges-and-their-renumeration-in-ireland-600-900-ad/

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